Category: Recorded workshops & trainings

If you missed an online workshop, or want to watch it again, you can find it here!

Our volunteers are what make our work possible. We couldn’t do nearly as much as we do in land conservation, water quality monitoring, and education without the many passionate people who give their time.

In this event we run through the variety of volunteer opportunities available, and talk about precautions we are taking this season due to COVID. This will be followed by a chance to ask questions about the opportunities that interest you most. There is a job for every interest, whether it’s monitoring water quality, stewardship, handy-work, hospitality, nature education, or photography!

New lessons from puffins and terns Hear from Dr. Stephen Kress and Dr. Don Lyons about seabird restoration in Maine. The story of how a colony of Atlantic puffins was restored off the coast of Maine offers hope and inspiration at a time when many seabird species worldwide are threatened because of invasive predatory mammals, marine pollution, and the effects of climate change. Dr. Kress provides examples of how methods he developed for bringing puffins back to Maine are helping to create new colonies of endangered seabirds around the world. Dr. Lyons shares how restored colonies of puffins and terns are …

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You know that small springtime pool of water in the woods that dries up in the summer? It is a critically important habitat for a number of insects and amphibians and it is called a vernal pool. Join Dr. Aram Calhoun, professor of Wetland Ecology at the University of Maine, to learn about vernal pool ecology and what you can do to manage pools on your property.

Who’s behind the spring serenade? As our Maine frogs start to move about and sing, spring is a good time of year to find and identify them. Join naturalist Sarah Gladu for an online program to learn all about Maine frogs: how to find them, how to identify them by their song, what interesting behaviors and characteristics they may have, and why they are important in our local habitats. Sarah will also talk about some threats to frog populations and share ideas for helping to protect frogs and other amphibians in your neighborhood. Recorded on April 9, 2021 in Damariscotta, …

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Join Sarah Gladu to learn how to feed and house bluebirds. Sarah will talk about characteristics specific to bluebirds, such as their family life and eating habits, and let you know how to ensure the houses you provide are both attractive to bluebirds and secure from predators. She will also share resources for purchasing bluebird houses, kits, poles and predator guards.

How do you tell a fisher from an otter by its footprints? Learn the finer points of tracking Maine wildlife in this online program with naturalist Sarah Gladu.

Sarah shares photos of tracks and signs and discusses the animals who left them, from birds to weasels.

Get a behind-the-scenes look at the harvest operation at Dodge Point Public Land in Newcastle, Maine. Hear about the goals, scope and status of the current project, and get some background on the Dodge Point property, formerly the award-winning Freeman Tree Farm. Forester Stephen Richardson explains how BPL is managing the stand for forest health, wildlife, and recreation, and answers participants’ questions about the expected short and long-term impacts of the harvest.

Join Sarah for a walk at Walpole Woods in South Bristol. This upland forest habitat provides wonderful cover and food for all sorts of animals and birds. See tracks left by jumping mice, red and gray squirrel, snowshoe hare, ruffed grouse, fox and more. Sarah also points out interesting plants, trees and other features she encounters along the way.

In this online program, Research Ecologist, Conservation Planner, and Coastal Rivers trustee Peter McKinley takes a look at how the ecology of the Damariscotta-Pemaquid region ties in to other regions, including the boreal forest. He shares how individual property owners, no matter how large or small the property, can contribute to the larger landscape of wildlife conservation in this region.

The Damariscotta River estuary is the backbone of our local economy. It offers incredible recreational opportunities and supports diverse and abundant wildlife. This invaluable resource is monitored on a regular, on-going basis by Coastal Rivers through a citizen-science water monitoring project.

In this recorded workshop you’ll hear from Sarah Gladu of Coastal Rivers and Kathleen Thornton from the University of Maine’s Darling Marine Center. They discuss estuarine conditions and share observations made from their analysis of Coastal River’s water quality data.